Dos A Cero Again! … United States Qualifies For World Cup 2014 After Another 2-0 Win Over Mexico

Broader Syria peace talks? Chemical weapons first

So, 2-0 once again for the United States national team against Mexico. Of course. (Dos a cero is Spanish for 2-0, just so you know.) Just like in 2001, 2005 and 2009, all in Columbus, all against Mexico in those past World Cup qualifiers. Just like the 2-0 score from El Tris painful loss to the United States in a 2002 World Cup elimination match. Dos a cero! Dos a cero! as the packed crowd at Crew Stadium taunted Mexico mercilessly. Along with Youre not going to Brazil Youre not going to Brazil! a chant that was one thing against little Panama but this was mighty Mexico! And with the border rival thrown tossed further into turmoil, the crowd just might be right. This is a huge, huge evening for all of us, Klinsmann said The team gave everything tonight, from the first second on, the effort, how they were dedicated to each other. The crowd, unbelievable. Amazing, amazing crowd here in Columbus, and it pushed these guys. Obviously, they are enjoying the moment now. (MORE: U.S.

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After meeting Friday with the emir of Kuwait, Sheik Sabah Al Ahmed Al Sabah, Obama said the U.S. and Kuwait are agreed that the use of chemical weapons in Syria was “a criminal act.” “It is absolutely important for the international community to respond in not only deterring repeated use of chemical weapons but hopefully getting those chemical weapons outside of Syria,” Obama said. In Syria itself, U.S. officials said, Assad is continuing to move caches of chemical weapons and their delivery systems to different locations, even as he joins the chemical weapons convention and pledges to turn over his arsenal to international control at some point. Assad has had the weapons distributed around the country in as many as four dozen sites for some time, and the U.S. has detected limited movements of the weapons in the last week or so, said two officials, speaking only on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to publicly discuss intelligence matters. At the United Nations, Ban said Assad’s government “has committed many crimes against humanity.” “Therefore, I’m sure that there will be surely the process of accountability when everything is over,” he said in response to a question. U.N. inspectors were sent to Syria to decide whether chemical weapons were used, but their mandate did not include assigning blame. The Obama administration says it has evidence that the Syrian government was behind the attack and that 1,429 people died. Some other estimates are lower, and the Syrian government has pointed to the rebels as the culprits. But the government also has expressed willingness to begin eliminating the weapons. More than 100,000 people have been killed in two years of civil war marked by grisly reports of attacks on civilians.